Singing bowls (also known as Tibetan Singing Bowls) are a type of bell, specifically classified as a standing bell. Rather than hanging inverted or attached to a handle, singing bowls sit with the bottom surface resting, and the rim vibrates to produce sound characterized by a fundamental frequency and usually two audible harmonic overtones (second and third harmonic).

Singing bowls are used worldwide for meditation, music, relaxation, and personal well-being. Singing bowls were historically made throughout Asia, especially China and Nepal.

Singing bowls are played by striking the rim with a padded mallet. They can also be played by the friction of rubbing a wooden, plastic, or leather-wrapped mallet around the rim to emphasize the overtones and a continuous ‘singing’ sound. Antique and new bowls are widely used as an aid to meditation. They are also used in yoga, music therapy, sound healing, religious services, performance, and for personal enjoyment.

Singing bowls are still manufactured today in the traditional way as well as with modern manufacturing techniques. New bowls may be plain or decorated. They sometimes feature religious iconography and spiritual motifs and symbols, such as the Tibetan mantra Om mani padme hum, images of Buddhas, and Ashtamangala (the eight auspicious Buddhist symbols).

New singing bowls are made in two processes. Hand hammering is the traditional method of creating singing bowls which is still used to make new bowls. The modern method is by sand casting and then machine lathing. Machine lathing can be done only with brass, so machine lathed singing bowls are made with modern techniques and modern brass alloy.

 

Source: Wikipedia